NJMS - UMDNJ Logo

Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
Alumni Association

Robert G. Carroll, Ph.D.
2005

Robert G. Carroll earned his Ph.D. under the direction of Dr. David F. Opdyke from the Department of Physiology of the GSBS of UMDNJ-Newark in 1981.  Following a 3 year post-doc at University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, MS under the sponsorship of Drs. Thomas E. Lohmeier and Arthur C. Guyton, he moved to East Carolina University in 1984 as an Assistant Professor of Physiology.  He is currently Professor of Physiology at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, and holds adjunct appointments in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and in the Department of Biology.  Dr Carroll’s research interests center on cardiovascular control, most recently on the alteration in body core temperature regulation following hemorrhagic shock.  He has mentored one doctoral student, 2 masters students, and published 47 research manuscripts.  In the area of physiology education, he has hosted visiting faculty members form Indonesia, Sudan, and Jamaica, has published 11 peer reviewed manuscripts, edited one book, and is a section editor for a Medical-Surgical Nursing textbook.  Dr. Carroll currently serves as chair of the Education Committee for the American Physiological Society, and is a member of the Education Committee of the International Union of Physiological Sciences.  He is an associate editor of the journal “Advances in Physiology Education”.  He has participated as speaker, co-chair or chair in sessions on education at meetings held in Hungary, Indonesia, Jamaica, Mexico, New Zealand, Pakistan, Russia, and Scotland.  In the past, he served on the USMLE Step I Physiology Test Material Development Committee of the National Board of Medical Examiners, and as Secretary for the International Association of Medical Science Educators.   In 2002, he was recognized in the inaugural class of Master Educators at the Brody School of Medicine, and received the Arthur C. Guyton Physiology Educator of the Year from the American Physiological Society in 2004.